Tag Archives: antibiotics

Poetry Friday ~ Slow & Work

1 Feb

Hello, everyone! Welcome.

 

I can’t believe it’s been nine weeks since my uterine cancer diagnosis and surgery ordeal. It’s almost like a distant memory, except I am dealing with some residual issues after the surgery/infection. Due to the infection introduced during my surgery I had to take two powerful antibiotics, one of them twice a day and the other three times a day. Taking antibiotics several times a day for so long has consequences. Of course, I had no choice, it was either take the antibiotics or die from septicemia (blood poisoning caused by bacteria).

I wanted to talk about this because many people don’t know that every time we take antibiotics we destroy many of the good bacteria in our bodies along with the bad ones, sometimes leaving ourselves vulnerable to other worse germs. Taking antibiotics several times a day for a month left me with very little good bacteria in my gut and that’s a big problem. Good bacteria are like little soldiers that fight off the bad bacteria and other bad things like fungi and keep them out of our bodies.

Both my primary physician (western medicine) and holistic doctor (natural medicine) agree that a lot of diseases stem from the gut because of all the bad bacteria that enter our system through our mouths. Replenishing the flora from my gut became a priority. Oil pulling is a great way to get rid of bad bacteria in your mouth before it enters your system, so I began doing that too.

If you haven’t tried oil pulling you should. One of the issues I had to face after a month of antibiotics was that my tongue turned white (Candida). I immediately began oil pulling with coconut oil every morning and my tongue is now rosy and normal again. Oil pulling is a great oral health routine.

Before eating or drinking anything, before brushing my teeth I put a heaping teaspoon of coconut oil in my mouth. I actually put it between the inside of my cheek and gum until it melts (it melts quickly) and then I swish it around in my mouth for about 15-30 minutes. I go about doing what I normally do, while swishing the oil in my mouth. Afterward, I go to my backyard and spit it out in a corner of the yard. Don’t spit it out in your sink because you’ll clog it after a while (it is oil). Then I floss and brush my teeth. Be sure to use 100% pure, organic, cold-pressed coconut oil.

There are so many benefits to oil pulling, especially with coconut oil. Oil pulling kills harmful bacteria in your mouth, gets rid of bad breath, reduces inflammation, and improves gum health. I also noticed after about a week that my teeth looked whiter and I had no morning breath.

So, if you’ve been sick and had to take antibiotics be sure to take probiotics afterward to help replenish the flora in your gut. Also, try oil pulling with coconut oil every morning before brushing your teeth. Doing these things have helped me significantly during my recovery, so I wanted to share it with you.

probiotics-Poetry_Friday-gut health-Tanka-Vashti Quiroz Vega-Vashti Q-author

Lovely to see you

Risen from the bed of fear

Making an effort

As you crawled toward wellness

Your pain taught us all to pray

coconut oil-oil pulling-Poetry_Friday-Tanka-Vashti Quiroz Vega-author-Vashti Q-health

 

Slow and Work are this week’s prompt words chosen by Colleen Chesebro ~ The Fairy Whisperer.

*The catch is that we can only use the synonyms to these words in our poems.

Colleen hosts a challenge that anyone could participate in called, Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge every Tuesday, and you have until Sunday to create a post featuring your Haiku, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree or Cinquain poem. She is an author and poet, and also does book reviews and so much more on her blog. Be sure to check it out.

Thank you for the visit! 

Real Life Horror: Superbugs

24 Feb

any-emergency-cdc-real life horror-superbugs

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has packaged a series of disaster preparedness resources for the general public related to the possibility of a zombie apocalypse.

♣555

5 Real Diseases That Could Make You Act Just Like A Zombie

“This is the way the world ends

Not with a bang but a whimper.”

~T S Eliot

real life horror: superbugs

 

I have written on this subject before. Read my article How Will The World End? I believe ‘Superbugs’ are a real threat and I have the Medical and Science communities to back me.

 

Rising Spread of Drug-Resistant Superbugs

“With a sinking stomach, I scrolled through my patient’s medical record, down the list of antibiotics that could do nothing to help her get well. Her infection was due to bacteria resistant to most of our antibiotics. Treating it would be challenging—if we could do it at all—and require a regimen of multiple antibiotics, each with their own side effects and interactions. I called the Infectious Disease physician for her input –- for the third time that day. I’d had two other patients with similarly resistant medications in the past five hours.”

~Darria Long Gillespie, MD

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How did we get here?

When doctors began using penicillin to treat infections in the 1940s, it was hailed as a “miracle cure.” Before antibiotics, strep throat was fatal. A simple urinary tract infection (UTI) could spread and lead to organ failure. Patients died from infections after surgery. But no longer. Infections that had once been inevitably fatal, claiming thousands of lives, were now treatable.

The balance shifts

Doctors started to notice that some patients seemed to be resistant to penicillin. Fortunately, pharmaceutical companies were able to develop other, more comprehensive, stronger antibiotics that could kill bacteria. But things are changing once again. And while new antibiotics are part of the solution, resolving the problem isn’t that simple.

drug-resistent-bacteria

 

A global health crisis

 

How big is the problem?

Big. And getting bigger. In the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that two million people become ill from resistant bacteria, and 23,000 die every year. It’s not just the U.S. and other developed countries, however. This is truly a global problem, especially in developing countries. In India, more than 58,000 infants died last year due to resistant infections. The World Health Organization (WHO) warns us of the possibility of entering into a “post-antibiotic era” in which our antibiotic regimens are ineffectual.

 

Why is this happening?

Overuse of antibiotics

Some doctors prescribe antibiotics for any little issue. Your toe nail hurts? Here’s a prescription for antibiotics. You sneezed twice this morning? Here’s a prescription for antibiotics. You scratched your head? Here’s a prescription for antibiotics.

– Antibiotics pumped into some of our animal food sources, creating drug resistance in those animals.

Some of those bacteria strains may get passed to humans.

– Patients failing to complete a course of antibiotics.

Think of the times you may have stopped or forgot to finish an antibiotic once you were feeling better.

 

Superbugs sound scary — and they are.

antibiotic-resistance-mrsa

 

A superbug is a strain of bacteria that can no longer be killed with an antibiotic — they become antibiotic resistant, or drug resistant. Some common infections and conditions that may become untreatable include MRSA, tuberculosis, urinary tract infections, E. coli and meningitis. Find out what you need to know to protect yourself and your family from superbugs, avoid infection and stay healthy.

superbug

 

“Anyone who pays attention to health news knows that deadly bacteria are a growing threat to everyone.” ~ Joel Fuhrman, MD

 

“Antibiotics are medications that fight bacterial infections. Often the bacteria learn how to avoid antibiotics over time. The more exposure to an antibiotic that bacteria have, the more likely the bacteria is to learn to avoid it. This is how bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics.”

~ Univ. of Nev. School of Medicine

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Have you ever stopped taking antibiotics a few days after beginning your dosage because you were feeling better? Do you take antibiotics every time you get a cold? Are you concerned about the growing number of ‘Superbugs’?