Tag Archives: poetry challenge

Poetry Friday ~ Photo Prompt

23 Oct
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Hello, everyone! A warm welcome to my blog.

I’m participating in Colleen’s 2020 Weekly Poetry Prompt Challenge. Today’s photo prompt was provided by Trent McDonald. I’m sharing a Haiku and Tanka.

Swans glide together

as lake mirrors the trees

a serene portrait

Photo by Belinda Fewings (@bel2000a)

Mysterious swans

enduring all the seasons

dressed in white feathers

Together for a lifetime

A beautiful, loving pair

I hope you enjoyed the poems. Thanks for stopping by!

Poetry Friday ~ Fantasy Angels Series

4 Sep

Hi, everyone! I hope you’re all having a fabulous start to the weekend.

“It’s the first of the month and you know what that means! Poets get to choose their own syllabic poetry form, theme, words, images, etc.” ~ Colleen Chesebro

The 3rd and final book in my Fantasy Angels Series, The Rise of Gadreel will be released in a couple of months. So today I’d like to talk a little about the first two books in the series and what they’re about.

The Fall of Lilith, the first book in the series is an origins story. The origin of the angels, of the revolution in heaven, of other supernatural beings that came into existance when fallen angels evolved upon landing in different areas of a primitive planet, the origin of Earth, of mankind and sin.

“I really enjoyed this book. I love when stories put a spin on biblical/historical stories, and this one definitely kept me entertained. Lilith is a deceptive little thing, and I loved reading about her journey, though I will admit that Gadreel held most of my affection throughout the book (which would probably really anger Lilith…lol!).”–Amazon Review

BLURB:

In The Fall of Lilith, Vashti Quiroz-Vega crafts an irresistible new take on heaven and hell that boldly lays bare the passionate, conflicted natures of God’s first creations: the resplendent celestial beings known as angels. 

If you think you know their story, think again.

Endowed with every gift of mind, body, and spirit, the angels reside in a paradise bounded by divine laws, chief of which are obedience to God, and celibacy. In all other things, the angels possess free will, that they may add in their own unique ways to God’s unfolding plan.

Lilith, most exquisite of angels, finds the rules arbitrary and stifling. She yearns to follow no plan but her own: a plan that leads to the throne now occupied by God himself. With clever words and forbidden caresses, Lilith sows discontent among the angels. Soon the virus of rebellion has spread to the greatest of them all: Lucifer.

Now, as angel is pitted against angel, old loyalties are betrayed and friendships broken. Lust, envy, pride, and ambition arise to shake the foundations of heaven . . . and beyond. For what begins as a war in paradise invades God’s newest creation, a planet known as Earth. It is there, in the garden called Eden, that Lilith, Lucifer, and the other rebel angels will seek a final desperate victory—or a venomous revenge.

“[A] compelling narrative that . . . strays far from traditional biblical text . . . A well-written, descriptive, and dark creation story.”—Kirkus Reviews

Spark of perfection

snuffed by ashes of desire

deep in the horrors

of ambition and envy

you evolved into evil

Son of the Serpent, the 2nd book in the series describes the life of Dracúl, the son of Lilith and Satan. He was abandoned in a forest as a small child. Despite being the son of demons he rejected evil. Tired of feeling lonely and insignificant he leaves the forest where he grew up alone. As a young man he meets Cain, the eldest son of Adam and Eve, and his adventure through time begins. After the shock of discovering who his parents were and the fact that his mother tried to kill him, leaving him for dead in a forest he began a quest to find her, to learn why. Despite many trials he refused to be like his parents and continued his efforts to be good. While on his journey to find his mother he witnessed many historical events like: the murder of Abel by his brother Cain, the building of the Tower of Babel, and the flood among others.

“It is rare in my experience to enjoy book two of a series even more than book one. And given that book one earned five stars from me, the fact that this book exceeds even that is a testament to the skill and clear love of this genre that permeates the work of author Vashti Quiroz-Vega.” –Amazon Review

BLURB:

In Son of the Serpent, award-winning author Vashti Quiroz-Vega crafts another fascinating glimpse into the dark, compelling world of fallen angels and demons, revealing more about their untold stories.

The war in heaven might be over, but the ambitions of the fallen angel Lilith reach far across the roots of history. Will there be a being powerful enough to stop her evil influence before the destruction of mankind?

Dracúl knows he is the son of Satan, but the rest of his memory has been taken from him. Alone and frightened, he awakens in a forest, beginning a quest to piece together who he is. The world he encounters is cruel, but he yearns to belong and find companionship. With each step he takes, another missing piece of his memory falls into place, revealing a truth that is ever more troubling . . .

A truth that will turn his quest for meaning into one fueled by the hot-blooded thirst for revenge. A truth that leads him to Lilith, the most wicked and ruthless of fallen angels and one he soon will have every reason to hate. His quest will consume him, perhaps ruin his life, but somehow Dracúl is determined to find both belonging and vengeance—to be good, in spite of his evil nature and the dark secrets that haunt him every step of the way.

The son of demons, and the last hope for the world.

A glance at the past

spark a pain my heart can’t share

an eye for an eye

revenge I planned from afar

but love & woe have worked their will

I hope you enjoyed learning a little more about my Fantasy Angels Series. I want to thank everyone who has purchased, read and reviewed the first two books in the series. I sincerely appreciate it. ❤

Poetry Friday ~ Cinquain

3 Apr

Hi, everyone! Welcome to my blog.

March is the first month to feature five Tuesdays. So, Colleen Chesebro from Colleen’s 2020 Weekly Poetry Challenge would like us to work with a specific syllabic poetry form.

This week’s form is:

The Cinquain & It’s Variations, (excluding the Tanka).

My contribution this week are a grouping of Reverse Cinquains:

Photo by Fred Pixlab
Listen
to the pounding of my heartbeat
it can better tell you
of my longing
for you
***
My love
I dream of you even when you
are sleeping by my side
and I miss you
always
***
We fought
harsh words tumbled from salty lips
fists balled like angry stones
sorrow lingered
I bled
***
I spoke
your name and cringed at its sour taste
it was all a dream that
ends in nothing
I woke


Sometimes relationships end badly, and all you can do is learn from your mistakes and move on. Some people argue as if it’s the last time they’re going to see the person they’re arguing with and so they say the nastiest things. Once you’ve crossed that line there’s no turning back. An argument doesn’t have to be the end of a relationship. This applies to disputes between friends, co-workers, siblings . . . We all have disagreements, but there’s no need to leave mental scars. There is a right way to argue. If more couples argued the right way there wouldn’t be so many break-ups. We can choose our words carefully because they are powerful, and if used to cause maximum damage things will end badly. Check out this article from Psychology Today. 10 Tips to Having Arguments the Right Way

“I’ve learned that no matter what happens, or how bad it seems today, life does go on, and it will be better tomorrow. I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights. I’ve learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you’ll miss them when they’re gone from your life. I’ve learned that making a “living” is not the same thing as making a “life.” I’ve learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance. I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back. I’ve learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision. I’ve learned that even when I have pains, I don’t have to be one. I’ve learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone. People love a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back. I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn. I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

~Maya Angelou

Photo by cloudvisual.co.uk

I appreciate your visit! Stay safe!

Poetry Friday ~ Photo Prompt

20 Mar

Welcome, everyone! I’m thrilled to have you visit. It’s the 3rd week of the month, and that means we have a photo prompt. Colleen’s 2020 Poetry Prompt Challenge.

Padre, from Padre’s Ramblings, provided the photo for this month’s challenge.

Here’s my contribution for this week, a Butterfly Cinquain:

I Prefer a Book

tempted

by the Autumn

that labored to make it

thoughts of the soil and its duty

and the

full bellies of

grapes who hang on to vines

that twirl and reach to the heavens

s o r r y.

“Reading—the best state yet to keep absolute loneliness at bay.”

—William Styron

Photo by Tim Rebkavets @timreb9

“Reading is a discount ticket to everywhere.” —Mary Schmich

I know there are many people who are self-quarantined or in mandatory isolation due to the coronavirus. Don’t despair. Grab a book, and meet some fascinating characters, walk in their shoes and take an extraordinary journey. I wish everyone a calm, safe and happy Friday and weekend.

Poetry Friday ~ The Circle of Life

31 Jan

Hi, everyone! Welcome.

It’s the fourth week of the month which means Colleen from, Colleen’s 2020 Weekly Poetry Challenge will pick a theme for us to write about for this month. On the Monday before the next challenge, she’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme. 

This month’s theme is:

“The Circle of Life”

Today I’m trying a new style of poetry called Gogyōka. It is a new form of a short poem that is based on the ancient Japanese Tanka and Kodai kayo. Gogyōhka has five lines but exceptionally may have four or six. Each line should be the duration of a single breath. 

Photo by Jordan Whitfield @whitfieldjordan

From the earth
we came
and to the earth
we return

Into flowers
we shall bloom
our fragrance
shall float

in the air
and travel the world

Thank you for stopping by! Have a lovely day.

Poetry Friday ~ Fall & Give

27 Sep fall-autumn-Poetry-Poetry_Friday-Nonet-Vashti Quiroz Vega

Fall and Give are this week’s prompt words chosen by Colleen Chesebro ~ The Fairy Whisperer.

*The catch is that we can only use the synonyms to these words in our poems.

Colleen hosts a challenge that anyone could participate in called, Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge every Tuesday, and you have until Sunday to create a post featuring your Haiku, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree or Cinquain poem. She is an author and poet, and also does book reviews and so much more on her blog. Be sure to check it out.

Photo by Alex Geerts

Here’s my contribution to this week’s poetry challenge. I hope you enjoy my double Nonet.

Let Go The Things That Belong To The Past

The Autumn is a distinct season.
It teaches us profound lessons
about life and sacrifice.
We need to embrace change.
Every change is
for the better.
We must learn
to let
go

Trees lose their leaves, and it’s both sad and
beautiful, painful, and needed.
Yet, it lets it go without
regrets and welcomes change.
Dwelling on the past
will stunt our growth
leaving us
stuck in
life

Photo by Anthony Intraversato

I’ve had the hardest time creating this post. OMG! At one point, I wanted to scream and give up. That’s how bad it was. I’ve just started using WordPress’ new Gutenberg block editor, and it hasn’t been easy. Thank goodness I have a brilliant friend who’s figured it all out and has posted numerous tutorials on her blog. If you’re having a hard time with Gutenberg block editor, do yourself a favor and check out Natalie Ducey’s blog.

Thank you for stopping by and have a great day!

Poetry Friday ~ Fantasy & Craving

5 Oct

 

All a dream

that ends in nothing,

and leaves me longing for you.

If only I could live in my mind.

Violet blue

Poetry_Friday-Vashti Quiroz Vega-The Writer Next Door-Vashti Q-Twitter-sidlak-poem-Tank_Tuesday-Colleen Chesebro

This style of micropoetry is called Sidlak. It’s a structured poetry consisting of 5 lines with 3579 syllables and a color. The last line must be a COLOR that describes the whole poem or the feelings of the writer.

I had a lot of fun with this style, especially when I had to come up with a color at the end. I love colors. When I see a person I often see a color associated with that person. And I’m not talking about race. I speak of a color that ties into their overall nature. Colors have also been proven to affect people’s moods.

Writing poetry helps me unwind and it’s a great way to get those creative juices flowing. Why don’t you give it a try?

Fantasy and Craving are this week’s prompt words chosen by Colleen Chesebro ~ The Fairy Whisperer.

*The catch is that we can only use the synonyms to these words in our poems.

Colleen hosts a challenge that anyone could participate in called, Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge every Tuesday, and you have until Sunday to create a post featuring your Haiku, Tanka, Haibun or Cinquain poem. She is an author and poet, and also does book reviews and so much more on her blog. Be sure to check it out.


*Reminder:

Preorder Son of the Serpent for only 99¢! Download the ebook today!

Poetry Friday ~ Happy & Morose

3 Aug

Hi, everyone! Welcome!

oak_tree-Poetry_Friday-haiku-haibun-Vashti Quiroz Vega-Vashti Q-Facebook-The Writer Next Door-Tanka_Tuesday-Colleen Chesebro

There once was a tall oak tree who lived in a small forest. Night and day it complained about its noisy leaves. It protested when the leaves sang songs with the wind. It grumbled about the music they made when it rained.

One day a blue jay landed on one of its limbs and overheard the oak gripe about its noisy leaves.

“You know,” the blue jay said. “I once knew a cactus who lived alone in the middle of the desert. He was a sad and lonely thing with no one to talk to. The snakes, scorpions and other desert creatures avoided him, for he had sharp spikes all over its skin.”

“What has that to do with me,” the tree grumbled.

“Well, every time I land on one of your branches I hear you complain about your leaves.”

“So what,” the tree said.

“The last thing the cactus told me before it died of a lonely heart was that it wished its prickles were leaves, so that it may hear their melody,” the bird said.

“If I never hear another leaf sing I would be a happy tree!”

“That is a horrible thing to say,” the bird said, fluttering its blue feathers. “Your leaves are beautiful and the rhythm they make with the wind and the rain is enchanting. They also attract all kinds of birds, snakes, and squirrels. Your days and nights are filled with cheerful pieces of music, laughter and conversation.

“I don’t need music, laughter or conversation. I just want silence!” the tree yelled.

The bird flew away.

One hot, dry summer day a fire broke out in the small forest. Some of the animals escaped the wildfires but many were killed. The crown fire burned the trees up their length to the very top, and few survived.

The tall grumbling oak did survive, but it was no more than a scorched and leafless trunk with naked limbs. None of the nearby trees survived and were chopped down. The colorful birds and animals were gone and only soot and smoke remained. The oak’s world was gray and silent.

Months passed in a blur. The oak tree began to miss the happy lilting of its leaves and their verdant color. “If only I could hear them sing once more I’d be a happy tree.”

A year passed in the blink of an eye and the sad and lonely oak tree was ready to give up. He thought about the beautiful lush canopy it once had, full of lively green leaves. He missed their songs and music and the birds and animals they invited.

Every night the oak prayed. “Mother Gaia, please return my leaves, so that I may hear them sing with the wind.” But every morning he awoke to bare branches. The pain of living in silence, in complete solitude was too much to bear.

As the life began to seep out of its heartwood, he noticed a little green sprout coming out of the ground a couple of feet from him.

“Little sprout,” the oak tree said. “Grow tall with a strong heartwood and a huge canopy made verdant by a myriad of leaves. Always be grateful for what you have. And, be careful what you wish for because you might just get it.” And with those words the oak tree left the world of the living.

Poetry_Friday-Poetry-haiku-haibun-Vashti Quiroz Vega-Vashti Q-Colleen Chesebro-Tanka_Tuesday-Twitter-short_story

 

Do not wish away

the cheerful things in your life

on your grumpy days

 

Happy and Morose are this week’s prompt words chosen by Colleen Chesebro ~ The Fairy Whisperer. *The catch is that we can only use the synonyms to these words in our poems.

Colleen hosts a challenge that anyone could participate in called, Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge every Tuesday, and you have until Sunday to create a post featuring your Haiku, Tanka, Haibun or Cinquain poem. She is an author and poet, and also does book reviews and so much more on her blog. Be sure to check it out.

Enjoy your day!