Tag Archives: Stephen King

Writer’s Quote Wednesday – HORROR – Scare Me Happy

3 Feb

Welcome everyone! It’s Writer’s Quote Wednesday! I’m a huge fan of Horror, so instead of having one quote today I’ve decided to post several quotes from some of my favorite writers in this genre. I hope you enjoy. 😀

The Basement-The Writer Next Door-Vashti Quiroz-Vega

I grew up reading Stephen King novels. He’s still one of my favorite authors. It started one day when an older cousin had finished reading one of Stephen King’s books. She put it down beside her and called her friends and proceeded to gush about how great it was on the phone. I became curious about it, because she seemed so excited.

I picked up the book and turned it in my hand gazing at the front and back covers. My cousin quickly took it from me and told me that I was too young to read it. Well, I rolled my ten-year-old eyes dramatically and that was it, from that moment on, all I wanted was to read that book.

Later on, I managed to sneak the book out of my aunt’s house and take it home with me. I had to hide it from my parents, because I knew they would never allow me to read a ‘Horror’ novel. I read the book from cover to cover in record speed––I couldn’t put it down.

Did it scare me? YES! Of course it did, but more than that, it taught me to have courage and to not be afraid to feel certain feelings. Horror books helped me confront the scary things of childhood, because––don’t fool yourself parents––childhood is frightening. Kids are so vulnerable and powerless in a world full of bad things. Horror provides a place in which children can move with their fears in a safe way that can teach them how to survive monsters and be powerful, too. Stephen King scared me happy!

When I returned the book to my cousin she didn’t even know it was missing. I told her I had read it and enjoyed it. She was surprised but let me borrow a couple more Stephen King books. That’s how I became a Stephen King and Horror fan.

“The charm of horror only tempts the strong”

Jean Lorrain

“Alone. Yes, that’s the key word, the most awful word in the English tongue. Murder doesn’t hold a candle to it and hell is only a poor synonym.” 

Stephen King

“Which is the true nightmare, the horrific dream that you have in your sleep or the dissatisfied reality that awaits you when you awake?”

Justin Alcala

“There is something at work in my soul, which I do not understand.”

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

“Horror fiction shows us that the control we believe we have is purely illusory, and that every moment we teeter on chaos and oblivion.”

Clive Barker

“I do know that for the sympathy of one living being, I would make peace with all. I have love in me the likes of which you can scarcely imagine and rage the likes of which you would not believe. If I cannot satisfy the one, I will indulge the other.”

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

“Read. Read. Read. Just don’t read one type of book. Read different books by various authors so that you develop different style.”

R.L. Stine

“You know how sometimes you tell yourself that you have a choice, but really you don’t have a choice? Just because there are alternatives doesn’t mean they apply to you.”

Rick Yancey, The 5th Wave

“Here is a list of terrible things,
The jaws of sharks, a vultures wings
The rabid bite of the dogs of war,
The voice of one who went before,
But most of all the mirror’s gaze,
Which counts us out our numbered days.”


Clive Barker, Days of Magic, Nights of War

“We make up horrors to help us cope with the real ones.” 

Stephen King

5 Reasons Horror in Children’s Literature Is a Good Thing

10 Novels That Are Scarier Than Most Horror Movies

Required Reading: 30 of the Best Horror Books

Colleen Chesebro is a writer, poet, and book reviewer. She hosts an inspiring event every Wednesday on her blog, Silver Threading, called Writer’s Quote Wednesday. Anyone can participate by choosing a quote by a favorite writer and posting it on your blog. Check out her weekly wrap-up every Tuesday and be inspired by all the quotes.

Ronovan, from Ronovan Writes and Colleen have joined forces! He has been linking his #BeWoW blog share (Be Wonderful on Wednesday) now to include: Be Writing on Wednesday. If you would like to combine both posts feel free to do so and link them to Colleen’s post. She will make sure and add you to the quote wrap-up she does each Tuesday. Please make sure and check out Ron’s blog for more writing inspiration and motivation!

Haiku Friday – Start & Hot

18 Sep

Hello everyone! Happy Haiku Friday! This week’s prompt words are Start and Hot. The words were provided by Ron of RonovanWrites. Ronovan is a writer and poet and he also does author interviews and much more. You can read some of his poetry and fiction pieces on his blog. He also hosts RonovanWrites Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge every Monday. Anyone can participate and he even teaches you what haiku poetry is and how to write it if you don’t already know.

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Night Terrors

by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

I awoke with a start

The heat still enveloped me

Nightmare of flames

night-terrors-The Writer Next Door

15 Famous Books Inspired by Dreams

“Nightmares exist outside of logic, and there’s little fun to be had in explanations; they’re antithetical to the poetry of fear.”
~ Stephen King

Writer’s Quote Wednesday – Read, Read, Read

26 Aug

Today is Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Colleen  from Silver Threading.

I’d like to encourage everyone today to pick up a book (or tablet) and read. I hear too many people say, way too often that they don’t have time to read. I know doctors, nurses, parents with multiple children, teachers, lawyers . . . who are avid readers. If they can make the time to read anyone can. And if you’re an aspiring writer, it is part of your job to read. Whenever I hear an aspiring writer say they don’t read, for whatever reason, the hairs at the back of my neck stand on end. Writers have to read––if they want to be any good.

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Writer’s Quote Wednesday – Easy Reading

19 Aug

Hello everyone! Welcome to my blog and Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Colleen of Silver Threading.

I borrowed today’s quote from Karen Oberlaender’s blog series 3 Quotes . Check out Karen’s Book reviews and 10 Statements author spotlights on her blog, My Train of Thoughts .

I chose a quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne. The quote is short and sweet and packs a mighty ‘truth’ punch.

Lilith Bookmark

Writing is not easy. If it were easy to write everyone would write a bestseller and win a nobel price. It takes intelligence, skill, talent, patience, resourcefulness, tenacity, creativity, and most of all imagination to write a good book. The genre is irrelevant. There are literary masterpieces in all genres.

So what makes a book good? In my opinion, a good book is one that’s easy to read. What do I mean by this? Well, I don’t mean that the author should use kindergarden level words. A book that’s easy to read is a book that keeps me entertained, the prose flows beautifully, and one chapter easily transitions into the next. A book that’s easy to read is fascinating, interesting and a little challenging. It’s content is unique and it’s pace is like a Zumba class––there’s lots of rhythm and movement but with a few breaks in between, so that we may catch our breath. A book that’s easy to read is a book that’s well written and researched. I want most of my questions answered by the end of the story––not all––but most. And I want to feel like I know the key characters well.

So what kind of book is difficult to read? I struggle when I read books with too many typos and mistakes. I rarely finish books that bore me with long descriptions of mundane things or preach to me too often. I love well written descriptions but when a writer goes on for two paragraphs with a description of an end table––come on! I also enjoy reading books that teach me something but don’t interrupt the story to preach to me every other paragraph. It’s just painful.

It isn’t easy to write a book and it’s even harder to write a book that’s easy to read.

List of book that are easy to read:

Finders Keepers by Stephen King

Dark Places by Gillian Flynn

The Girl On The Train by Paula Hawkins

Queen of Shadows by Sarah J. Maas

Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes

Coraline by Neil Gaiman

House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski

The Scarlet Gospels by Clive Barker

 

Writer’s Quote Wednesday

13 May

Hi everyone! Welcome to ‘Writer’s Quote Wednesday‘ prompted by Colleen from Silver Threading. Visit Colleen’s blog and take part. You can quote one of your best-loved writers, make up your own quote, or feature a quote you enjoyed from one of your favorite books.

Stephen King Quote

“You have to remain faithful to what you’re working on.”

~ Stephen King

How many times have you been tempted to scrap the writing you began because you thought it wasn’t working out, but you stuck with it and it blossomed into a fascinating story? It’s happened to me several times. I almost gave up on my book, The Fall of Lilith on several occasions. At times I felt I was in over my head, but giving up would have been a mistake. Now, I consider The Fall of Lilith to be one of my best work to date. If you give up on a story every time things start to get complicated you’ll never finish a single one. If you get stuck, stop writing and go for a walk, eat something, bake, exercise, read . . . take a break from your writing for a while, and when you return to it you’ll see things from a different perspective.

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♥♥♥

Stephen King

26 Dec

 

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Stephen Edwin King is an American author of contemporary horror, supernatural fiction, suspense, science fiction, and fantasy.

 

Hello, my name is Vashti and I’m a writer of horror, fantasy, and suspense/thriller. It’s no secret, to those who know me, that I’m a huge fan of author Stephen King. I’ve read most of his books, including the non-horror ones. It is always a bit scary for an avid reader, such as myself, to go watch a movie adaptation of a book I’ve loved reading. Too many times things go horribly wrong. Like when a director or screenwriter change too much of the storyline and mix in a great deal of ‘hollywood’. Like they’re going to tell a better story then Stephen King, really? The directors and screenwriters that have remained within Stephen King’s storyline have gotten it right. Don’t mess with a good thing people.

Anyway, I get goosebumps and chills up and down my spine when I’m asked who Stephen King is. I take a few steps back and imagine a green gooey alien behind his/her skin mask. You’d have to be from another planet not to have heard of Stephen King. He is the bestselling author on the planet and a very wise man. Today, I’m going to list some of my favorite Stephen King books, movie adaptations, and quotes. If you’re not familiar with who Stephen King is you will by the end of this post and maybe you’ve been a fan of his all along and didn’t even know it. 😉

Stephen King 126

 

My Favorite Stephen King Books:

1/  The Green Mile

2/ Salem’s Lot

3/ Misery

4/ The Shining

5/ The Stand

 

My Favorite Stephen King Movie Adaptations:

1/ Misery

Misery

2/ The Green Mile

imgthe green mile3

3/ The Mist

The Mist

4/ The Shining

the shining_stephen king_horror

5/ Stand By Me

standbyme

 

 

My Favorite Stephen King Quotes:

1/  “Talent is cheaper than table salt. What separates the talented individual from the successful one is a lot of hard work.”

2/  “And as a writer, one of the things that I’ve always been interested in doing is actually invading your comfort space. Because that’s what we’re suppose to do. Get under your skin, and make you react.”

3/  “Get busy living, or get busy dying.”

4/  “I am the literary equivalent of a Big Mac and fries.”

5/  “Books are uniquely portable magic.”

blog_StephenKing1

Stephen King

by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

Ö

Mysterious valleys

Distinct from all the rest

The Mind of a king

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Are you a fan of Stephen King? What Stephen King books have you read? What movie adaptation is your favorite?

Writing Process Blog Hop!

20 Aug

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Hello! I hope everyone is having a wonderful day so far. Welcome to my blog. My lovely friend, Yolanda Isabel Regueira Marin, has invited me to participate in a writing process blog hop. Yolanda is a very talented poet and writer, and you can read and enjoy her work in her blog: Life Love and Other Catastrophes. Please check out her poems, you will not be disappointed.

Yolanda-Isabel-Regueria-Marin Yolanda-isabel-regueria-marinyolanda-isabel-regueria-marin

 

 

 

 

 

RULES:

 

  1. Introduce who referred the blog tour to you.
  2.  Answer the following 4 questions:

1) What am I working on?

2) How does my work differ from others in its genre?

3) Why do I write what I do?

4) How does my writing process work?

  1. Introduce the people you’re passing this on to who will then post a week later.

 

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***Since I have participated in the Writing Process Blog Hop a couple of times already I decided to change the questions up a little for the sake of not boring my readers to death. Those of you who will continue this blog hop can of course answer the original questions listed above. You can check out my other blog hops here and here. Thanks!

1- Is there a certain type of scene that’s harder for you to write than others? Love? Action? Racy?

I find romantic scenes particularly challenging, even more so than erotic ones. I believe it’s because to me, a romantic gesture should be touching, extraordinary and enchanting in order to feel genuine—otherwise it’s just another cheesy line in a story. When I write a romantic scene, I want the reader—whether male or female—to stop and savor the moment. That’s very difficult to do, and I wish I could say that I always achieve that.

2- Is there one subject you would never write about as an author? What is it?

I would never write about my family or friends because instead of a non-fiction novel, it would turn out to be a comedy/horror novel. Ha, ha! Just kidding!

3- Do you read your reviews? Do you respond to them, good or bad? Do you have any advice on how to deal with the bad?

Oh, boy! I remember when I published my first book, The Basement. I was getting all great reviews, and then I received my first dreaded two-star review. I felt like my world was collapsing around me. I was saddened, disappointed, and angry—all because of this one review. To add insult to injury, the person did not even have the decency to tell me why he gave me such a low rating. Well, I ranted and raved about it. I didn’t know any better. It was my first published book. I still couldn’t believe I had written a full-length novel or that I got it published, and I became very emotional about this insignificant, wordless review. I finally contacted the reviewer, which I know now never to do, and asked him why he gave me a two-star review. “What was it about the book you didn’t like?” I asked. Do you know what he told me? (Of course you don’t.) He told me not to take it personally. He said he had a friend whose book was in the same category as mine, and I was a slot ahead of him on the Goodreads list. What? I didn’t even respond to such nonsense.

Well, since then I have learned a great deal. Most reviewers will give you a good explanation as to why they’ve given you a good or bad review, and you can learn from their critique. Whether you choose to read the reviews or not, just remember that not everyone is going to like your book, no matter how good it may be. There are books that I absolutely loved that received several terrible reviews. Even novels from my favorite writers—Anne Rice, Stephen King, Dan Brown . . . And there have been books that I just couldn’t finish because they bored me silly, which have gotten great reviews from other readers who did enjoy them.

4- Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Sitting next to Ridley Scott or Wolfgang Petersen, the director of a movie based on one of my epic fantasies, at the Academy Awards. All joking aside, I hope to still have the passion and drive to write, and to still be writing novels.

5- How important are names to you in your books? Do you choose the names based on liking the way it sounds or the meaning?

I think names are very important—at least the names of your main character and other important characters. For my novel The Basement, I did a Google search for the most popular names for kids between the ages of 11-13, since those were the ages of the kids in the story and also the audience the book was aimed at.

For the first book in my Fantasy Angels Series, The Fall of Lilith, I did some research in the Bible, Torah, and Quran and books related to those, about angels and their names.

6- What are you working on now? What is your next project?

I’m about to begin querying my second book, The Fall of Lilith, which is the first installment in my Fantasy Angels Series (Adult/Dark Fantasy). However, I’ve been really torn about whether to spend all the time required to query the book and get representation, and then a publisher, or to just publish it on my own. If you have advice on this issue, it would be greatly appreciated.

I’m also busy writing the second installment of the series, Dracul (working title).

 

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Look for the Blog Hop to continue soon at these sites: 

 

Alana Munro – Alana is known as ‘The Author Who Supports’, and for good reason. She’s been a kind and supportive friend to me since I started my blog a little over a year ago. As if that weren’t enough she is a huge talent. Her book, Women Behaving Badly is a #1 bestseller on Amazon. I read the book, and not only did it entertain me, but it also taught me a few lessons. Isn’t that awesome? What more can you ask from a book? She also writes insightful, interesting and informative posts on her blog: Alana Munro – Author & Blogger Check it out!

alana-munro

Author Alana Munro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chantal Bellehumeur – Chantal is an amazing woman. She’s a talented horror writer, artist, and model. Her book Just Another Common Killer is on my to-read list. Check out her website here.

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Horror Author Chantal Bellehumeur

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lorraine Marie Reguly – Lorraine is one of the hardest working writers I know. She’s also a blogger that blogs about writing and other subjects, teacher, and editor. Lets just say I’ve learned a few things from her. Check out her blog Laying it Out There, check out her eBook Risky Issues, and also stay tuned for author Lorraine Reguly’s Spotlight, right here on my blog, coming soon.

Lorraine-Reguly-author

Author Lorraine Reguly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As readers, do you enjoy reading about how writers work? Who’s your favorite writer, and why? What types of books do you read? What genre?

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Writing Process Blog Hop

9 Mar

Hello everyone! I was invited to participate in a tagging Blog Hop by the lovely and engaging Amanda Stanley. Her blog, Amanda Stanley: Fulfilling The Dream Of Becoming A Writer, is a compilation of stories, interesting articles and guest posts, author spotlights and interviews. Like me, she loves photography and sometimes shares her photographs with her readers. I recommend you check out Amanda’s blog, for you will be pleasantly surprised.

 

 

There are a few simple rules:

1/ I must answer the four questions below.

2/ I must link back to the person who invited me to this Blog Hop.

3/ I must name four writers who will continue this Blog Hop and notify them.

 

 

 

Questions:

 

1) What are you working on?

I’m working on several projects at the moment. I’m editing the first installment of my Fantasy Angels Series, Lilith. I’m writing the second installment, Dracul. I’m working on sketches for a children’s picture book.

 

 

2) How does your work differ from others in the genre?

I believe writers develop their own unique style over time. I enjoy weaving in a bit of romance and/or humor to lighten my horror or dark fantasy stories. I love adding suspense and thriller elements to everything I write.

 

 

3) Why do you write what you write?

I grew up reading novels by Stephen King. I love to read horror (but not all types), suspense, thriller and fantasy. So basically, I write what I love to read.

 

 

4) How does your writing process work?

I’m a pantster when it comes to short stories. I get an idea in my head, and I run with it until it arrives at whatever end. When it comes to novels, I’m somewhere in between. I don’t believe you can write a 120,000-140,000 word novel by the seat of your pants. A well-written novel–one that’s exciting and thrilling with a great plot and well-developed characters–takes time, plotting, organization and good editing. I like to ponder my idea for a while. I always have my iPhone handy in case an idea for the story pops into my head while I’m driving, in the bathroom or at work. I’ve been known to rush off in the middle of things to record something that occurred to me, inspired by something I just saw or heard (my friends and family are used to it, and they forgive me). I do some light mapping and write a loose outline to organize my thoughts, but the process still flows organically and many times, the story goes off the map. I enjoy sketching my characters, animals and worlds I’ve created.

 

 

Look for the Blog Hop to continue next week at these sites: ( I know I was only suppose to pick four writers, but these six came to mind immediately and I couldn’t choose between them.)

 

Writing My Novel–No Working Title Yet

Teagan Kearney has a wonderful blog. She shares writing advice and also writes about her writing journey. I’ve often been inspired and enlightened by her uplifting posts. She ends each post with an update of her writing process and a haiku (I so look forward to these–they’re really good).

Teagan Kearney

Jumping From Cliffs:  One Man’s Adventures In Writerland

What can I say about Jon Simmonds, other than he’s brilliant? His blog posts are fun to read and also quite informative and helpful especially to aspiring writers.

Jon Simmonds

 

 

 

 

From A Clogged Mind

Robert Price is a talented writer and poet. He writes fascinating short stories and passionate poems.

Robert Price

 

 

 

Life, Love and Other Catastrophes

Yolanda Marin is one of the sweetest and kindest people I have had the privilege to befriend online. She is an amazing poet. The poems and articles on her blog are very beautiful and about as real as you can get.

 

 

 

KCross Writing

I love Katie Cross! She is dulcet, quirky and talented. I enjoy reading her blog posts because they’re always fun.

Katie Cross - Author Interview - Vashti Quiroz-Vega's Blog

 

 

 

Cicampbellblog

Christine Campbell is a delightful person and talented author. It is truly a joy to visit her inspiring blog.

Christine Campbell

Christine’s new release Flying Free is available in paperback and as an eBook.

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TERROR

14 Oct

TERROR

(^ For creepier effect turn on sound-effect)

Hey everyone! Continuing my efforts to completely creep you out this month I will begin with a hair-raising quote by the master of horror: Stephen King. Enjoy the story. Oh! If you’d like to heighten the creep-factor, press play on the sound player just below the picture of the strange doll. Enjoy!

The 3 types of terror: The Gross-out: the sight of a severed head tumbling down a flight of stairs, it’s when the lights go out and something green and slimy splatters against your arm. The Horror: the unnatural, spiders the size of bears, the dead walking around, it’s when the lights go out and something with claws grabs you by the arm. And the last and worse one: Terror, when you come home and notice everything you own had been taken away and replaced by an exact substitute. It’s when the lights go out and you feel something behind you, you hear it, you feel its breath against your ear, but when you turn around, there’s nothing there…

~Stephen King

TERROR

 by Vashti Q

He touched me. His cold fingers lay upon my bare shoulder and made me shudder. His breath, icy, lingered on the hairs standing on end at the back of my neck.

 

I turned quickly.

 

No one.

 

My eyes flickered in every direction searching for his likeness. I was alone in my room.

 

This is not the first time this has happened to me. He still torments me. It was not enough to do so while he was still among the living. He visits me now as he did then . . . only at midnight.

 

At first it was only a touch, and he was gone—back to the place where phantoms dwell. Cold and piercing as was his contact, I preferred it to the unspeakable things he now does to me. I can’t get away so I lie awake, waiting for him, as I did not too long ago when he was still alive.

 

Alive, in the dead of night, he used to leave my mother in a drunken sleep and sneak inside my bedroom. He’d put a hand over my mouth and threaten to kill me if I spoke a word to anyone of the vile acts he would perform on my teenage body. Back then my mind would escape, leaving my body to suffer the terror and pain. I escaped to a faraway place to be by myself. Being alone then was a blessing. When he was finished with me for the night, I’d lie writhing in pain, bleeding and sobbing against my pillow as he once more made threats to end me before departing my room.

 

There is no escaping him now. He haunts my mind, my very soul, and being alone now is synonymous with hell. How do you rid yourself of a ghoul—an evil spirit that plagues your slumber? I wish I knew. Night after night, he tortures me. My shrieks and howls go unheard. I am on my own.

 

Tonight I will put an end to my suffering. I can no longer endure the hurt and anguish he inflicts on me. I should have done this long ago. Perhaps this would have been a better solution to ending the agony, rather than the one I ultimately chose.
Uggh! As I run a piece of glass along my wrist to the point of bleeding, I tell myself the excruciating pain is only temporary. My hand shakes uncontrollably, making it difficult to finish what I began, but I am determined to end this nightmare. I will be rid of him once and for all.

 

Argh! The agony! It is as if I just forced white-hot pokers into my arms. My fingers cramp and seize into claws. Slitting one’s wrists is not the painless, glamorous death the movies make it out to be. It is repulsive, foul, excruciating. I watch the blood gush out of me like geysers. There is gore everywhere. The smell of metal and fear assaults my nostrils. My chest feels tight. I scream. I cannot prevent myself from screaming in anguish. The pain. Oh God, the pain!

 

I feel a chill in my bones. I have an obscure sensation like something is expanding inside of me, filling me with haze. I . . .  I–––

 

 

*

The doctor bent over, hands on knees, panting after running from the other side of the hospital. “Nurse, how could she do this with your station right outside the room?”

 

“I heard nothing—only silence—but when I entered the room to administer the nightly medications, I found her like this.”

 

“Did you . . . ” deep breath, “move the body?”

 

“I found her just as you see her.”

 

“In all my years tending the mentally insane, I have never seen anything like this.” The doctor pulled a small tape recorder out of his lab coat and pressed the record button. “The patient is nude and covered in blood from head to toe. Her eyes are open and they gaze at me as if they could see me. Her arms are extended, her hands together, one over the other, palms up, resting on her thighs proximate to her knees. Her legs are crossed at the ankles.” He paused and took another deep breath. “The only visible wound on her body is a large laceration on her chest. It begins inferior to her sternum and extends to the left. It appears to be self-inflicted, although I have not been able to locate the instrument used.” The doctor gulped and continued. “Lying on the palm of her hand appears to be–––her heart.” He switched off the recorder.

 

“Do we have to move her?”

 

“Call the police.”

 

 

*

“This is how they found her?” one of the orderlies asked.

 

“Yes. Neither the doctor nor the police wanted to move her,” the other hospital assistant said.

 

“Strange. She looks like she’s just sitting comfortably in the chair, waiting for someone. Her dainty hands offering her heart as if on a platter. She should be slumped over, but she’s sitting upright and alert. Her open eyes look aware, and her face has an innocent tranquil quality. She looks as if at any moment she would break words. I don’t believe she was capable of doing this.”

 

“Of course she was capable! Both the doctor and police confirmed it. One of the CSI police noticed a large piece of glass jutting out slightly from the gash on her chest. She used it to cut herself open. I don’t understand how she could have that expression on her face after all that pain. Her faint smile and serene expression are unnerving. Besides, no one that ends up in this place is innocent. She murdered her stepfather in cold blood while he slept. Her mother awoke to find her straddling him, dressed only in his blood and gore. She stabbed him seventy-eight times. Her mother said she saw a demon in her eyes that night.”

 

“Why did she do it?”

 

“She claimed her stepfather abused her sexually.”

 

“Surely that must have driven her to it.”

 

“No, it would have been impossible for her stepfather to abuse her since he was paralyzed from the waist down.”

 

“Oh.” The orderly gawked at the young girl’s corpse. “Wow, she must have really been crazy.”

 

Copyright © 2013 by Vashti Quiroz-Vega. All rights reserved.

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