Tag Archives: Vashti QuirozVega

Haiku Friday & Criminal Minds

29 Nov

Hello! Welcome to my blog!

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I’m a day late for this post. Sorry about that. I had a lot on my plate this week and I’m not talking about turkey and stuffing. Ha, ha! Get it . . . turkey and stuffing . . . never mind. I have always enjoyed reading haiku poems. Now, I’m enjoying writing them. They are so much fun to write and really get my creative juices flowing. That’s why I started Haiku Friday! Every Friday I will post a different haiku. I will feature my work, as well as haiku poetry written by others. I love infusing my haiku with a touch of horror, so most of my haiku will have a bit of a dark side.

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One of my guilty pleasures is watching a show called Criminal Minds it’s one of my favorite TV dramas and the inspiration for this week’s haiku.

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My favorite characters on the show are Dr. Spencer Reid, Hotch, and JJ but they’re all great.

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Hotch, JJ, and Dr. Spencer Reid

 

 

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Haiku

 

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Black Market

by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

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Fall leaves blow in the wind

Chilled night air through open door

Kidneys on ice

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Missing

by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

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An icy pond shimmers

A blanket of snow

A corpse hidden ’til spring

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Do you watch Criminal Minds or any other crime drama on TV? What are your guilty pleasures? What inspires you to write, cook, craft? Have you ever tried writing a poem, song, or story?

10 Statements – Vashti Quiroz-Vega

12 Mar

CHECK IT OUT! I’m featured on Karen Oberlaender’s 10 STATEMENTS! Ö

My train of thoughts on...

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My name is Vashti Quiroz-Vega, and I’m a writer of Fantasy, Suspense, Thriller and Horror. My first novel, The Basement, was released in August 2013. It was one of the happiest and proudest moments of my life. It was not easy getting my book published. Once upon a time, I was very naive when it came to the publishing process. I thought all I had to do as a writer was to write the book. Soon, I had a rude awakening when I found out that my manuscript had to be edited. Then I discovered I had to get an agent in order to interest a publisher, and I had to write a query letter in order to get an agent! Well, after many months of querying, I finally got my manuscript in the hands of a publisher… who wanted it edited some more. Phew! A year later, my book…

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What Really Happened On The Original Thanksgiving Day?

5 Nov

What Really Happened On The Original Thanksgiving Day?

Hello, everyone! Welcome to my blog. November is here; the eleventh month of the year. Wow! I can’t believe this year is almost over. November is a month of spring in the Southern Hemisphere and autumn in the Northern Hemisphere. The Romans named the month of November from novem, which is Latin for nine, since November was their ninth month.

Here in the USA, November is the month for giving thanks. Thanksgiving is a national holiday here, but it was not always so. There’s a cute fact about this: the woman who wrote the classic nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb” also played an integral role in making Thanksgiving a national holiday. She was a magazine editor named Sarah Josepha Hale. She wrote letters to elected officials and campaigned for seventeen years. Now that’s what I call perseverance! She finally convinced President Abraham Lincoln to issue a decree recognizing Thanksgiving as a national holiday in 1863. Good for her!

My family has always celebrated Thanksgiving in the traditional way. Our meal consists of a large roasted turkey, cranberry sauce (a must at my house), mashed potatoes and gravy, candied yams (which I make with cream, brown sugar and my secret ingredient: marshmallows), stuffing, cornbread and green-bean casserole. Dessert usually consists of some kind of pie—usually pumpkin, pecan or apple—and chocolate cake (my brother has to have it). This is a very time-honored menu, in keeping with the traditional meal eaten by the original pilgrims at Plymouth Rock. Elsewhere, traditional dishes may reflect the region or cultural background of those celebrating, such as macaroni and cheese, collard greens, Kugel, latkes, biscuits, rutabagas, peas and carrots, and much more. Is anyone else getting hungry?

We all know (well, most of us in the USA) the sugarcoated version of the events that transpired on that first Thanksgiving Day. Or do we really? There’s a famous quote by Winston S. Churchill, and it reads like this; “History is written by the victors.” Hmm. I wonder what he meant by that?

This is the version of Thanksgiving I was taught in school: Civilized European Pilgrims set out across the Atlantic Ocean, and their efforts were rewarded with an entire continent of untold wealth. (Never mind the half-naked natives running around.) In 1621, after working, praying and surviving a bitter winter, the pilgrims took in an abundant harvest yielded by seeds brought from home. Inviting their heathen neighbors to join them, the Pilgrims gave thanks for their New World and its riches at a meal.

I guess what you learn in school changes every few years, so you have to re-learn stuff you thought you knew (like Pluto was a planet and now it isn’t, even though it has five moons). Okay, I’m already confusing myself, so let me continue before I lose you.

So that was the story of Thanksgiving I grew up believing. I have a friend who is a Native American Indian. I just found out that she does not celebrate Thanksgiving! I asked her why, and her response completely surprised me.

Wampanoag Indian

Wampanoag Indian

She says what really happened on that first Thanksgiving Day went more like this: After two months at sea and several deaths, the Pilgrims landed in July of 1620 on the coast of Massachusetts where the Wampanoags lived. These Indians wore leather garments (adding furs during the winter) and skillfully cultivated corn, beans, squash and pumpkins. They also hunted the woods for dear, elk and bear and fished for salmon and herring.

The wheat the Pilgrims brought from Europe was completely unsuited to the New England soil and failed to germinate. Half the settlers died during that first winter. The natives took pity on the Pilgrims. They saw they had no food and did not know how to work the land. So they brought them venison and furs, taught them how to plant corn using fish as fertilizer, how to dig for clams and tap maple trees for syrup. The Indians saved them from starvation and death.

The natives had a custom of celebrating six different thanksgiving festivals during the year. A dinner party the settlers were celebrating coincided with one of the Indians’ thanksgiving festivals, and they invited the generous natives who had saved their lives.

More than ninety Indians showed up for dinner. The Pilgrim menu was not enough for such a large crowd, so several Indians went out and returned with five deer. Here’s what was actually on the original Thanksgiving menu: venison, wild duck, wild geese, eels, clams, squash, corn bread, berries and nuts.

That meal was one of the last untroubled moments the settlers and natives spent together. Journals and letters written by those first settlers contain accounts of plundering indigenous stows of food, tools and furs. If the pilgrims hit upon it, they seized it. Within fifty years, most of the Wampanoags had died off, most claimed by European diseases, others murdered outright. Today, there are still five hundred Wampanoags living in New England.

They do not celebrate the American Thanksgiving.

Whatever the history of Thanksgiving, I believe it is a day to give thanks for what we have. Too often we focus on what we don’t have—or worse—on what others have that we want. Let’s give thanks for another day of living, for the roof over our heads, for our health, our family and even our pets (that bring us so much joy). As a matter of fact, we don’t have to wait for that one day a year to be grateful. Let’s give thanks everyday because if you focus on the positive, you will see that there’s always something to be thankful for.

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When Friendship Goes Awry

20 Jun

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Illustrations by Zindy S. D. Nielsen

 

 

Hello everyone! Welcome to my blog. As a writer I’m always revising my work. Each time trying to make it better. I’m posting a revised version of my poem ‘Best Friend’. I hope you like it.

Accompanying my poem are beautiful illustrations by a very talented artist from Denmark Zindy Nielsen. I believe the art compliments my poem. I hope you do too.

 

 

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Best Friend

by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

The sun shone brightly on the day we met.
The radiance of your smile promised eternal sunshine.
When darkness loomed I dried the sorrows you wept.
Always by your side, I offered dawn when you suffered stress.
I was gravity, ever-present for each trivial affair of your life.
But when I needed you most, you couldn’t care less.

As I neared my goals, and success was within my reach.
The luster of friendship began to dull in your eyes.
Why do you despise me? Tormented, in my mind I screeched.
You feigned to listen, when all the while
you gathered information to judge me with.
Why the hatred, my friend? Why am I on trial?

When you betrayed me, the skies grew gray and dark.
My heart bled within me as the storm clouds gathered in your eyes.
You held up a broken mirror to show me my heart.
Sodden by the tempest of envy, unable to tolerate my radiant soul.
You set out to drain my spirit with distorted images you presented.
Until one day, in another’s eyes, my heart’s true reflection I stole.

Eerie, cold, and turbulent was the night our friendship ended.
I was too fetching, too clever, too creative for you to love me.
How am I to release my disappointment? Will my heart ever be mended?
Your spiteful squalls tore a hole in my heart, but my spirit you did miss.
Some friends crush you with a cold glare or a hurtful word.
A jealous friend betrays you with a cowardly kiss.

Copyright © 2013 by Vashti Quiroz-Vega. All rights reserved.

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Friends should encourage you, make you happy, and love you unconditionally. If you’re having problems with a friend, please check this out. http://m.wikihow.com/Detox-a-Friendship

 

Do you have a friend that acts more like an enemy? Are you in or have you been in a situation where a friend was jealous or envious of your success, job, boyfriend . . . ? What did you do about it?